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DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.26855/ijfsa.2021.03.025

Determinants of Adoption of Soil and Water Conservation Technologies in Coffee-Growing Areas of Ethiopia

Date: March 29,2021 |Hits: 690 Download PDF How to cite this paper

Kalkidan Fikirie

EIAR, Holeta Agricultural Research Center, P. O. Box 31, Holeta, Ethiopia.

*Corresponding author: Kalkidan Fikirie

Abstract

Soil erosion is a threat to the economic development of Ethiopia as it affects the agricultural sector significantly. Even if several SWC practices were introduced and implemented to combat soil erosion, the adoption of these practices remains below the expectations. This study aimed to investigate the main factors that influence the adoption of physical SWC practices in coffee-growing areas of Ethiopia. The study used quantitative and qualitative primary data collected from subsistence farmers and other stakeholders from major coffee-growing areas of the country (Oromia and SNNP). Binary Logistic Regression (BLR) model was used to examine factors that affected the adoption of physical SWC practices. The study result showed that 49% and 44% of farmers used physical SWC practices on their land along Oromia and SNNP, respectively. Soil bund is a commonly used conservation practice in the study regions. Out of the adopters of physical SWC measures, 45% constructed soil bund which is higher at Oromia (53%) and low in the SNNP region (37%). The finding of the study also indicated the positive and significant effect of education, extension (access to extension services and participation on field days), and ownership of communication devices especially radio on the adoption of physical SWC practices. The study suggests policymakers and public authorities give due attention to problems affecting effective farmers-extension linkage. The farmers’ training center system which is partially functioning currently should be strengthened to its full capacity. The positive effect of radio ownership on technology adoption also suggests the need for launching FMs channels to farmers which initially focuses on the provision of SWC practices information and knowledge.

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How to cite this paper

Determinants of Adoption of Soil and Water Conservation Technologies in Coffee-Growing Areas of Ethiopia

How to cite this paper: Kalkidan Fikirie. (2021) Determinants of Adoption of Soil and Water Conservation Technologies in Coffee-Growing Areas of Ethiopia. International Journal of Food Science and Agriculture5(1), 189-198.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.26855/ijfsa.2021.03.025

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