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DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.26855/er.2020.07.001

Exploring the Real-Life Experiences of Regular Teachers Handling Children with Autism in Inclusive Setting

Date: August 6,2020 |Hits: 1755 Download PDF How to cite this paper

Rowena V. De La Cruz

SPED Teacher I, DepEd Employee No. 4671607, Saluysoy Integrated School, Philippines.

*Corresponding author: Rowena V. De La Cruz

Abstract

Regular teachers assume an important role in educational setting; primarily they are responsible for ensuring that an adequate learning environment is established for children with autism who are in inclusive school programs. If the regular teachers’ views and acceptance fail to reflect a deepened understanding about the disability, a less than favorable educational opportunity is risked for children with autism in this setting. In search for comprehensive and in-depth under-standing, a descriptive phenomenological design was used to describe and ex-plore the regular teachers’ real-life experiences. It sought to establish: How do regular teachers describe their real-life experiences in handling children with autism in inclusive setting; and how they describe their role and extent of in-volvement in handling children with autism in inclusive setting based from their real-life experiences. Findings suggest that: There were different challenges faced by regular teachers and if not addressed properly, the same experiences will be experienced by other regular teachers who handle other disabilities in an inclusive setting and would cause a total failure of the program; even though they find inclusion program to be very hard and challenging it still creates a positive effect with which regular teachers adapts to change and improve or professionally develops themselves; and they believe that they are responsible for ensuring that an adequate learning environment is established for children with autism as well as other students who are in inclusive setting. A parallel study on the real-life experiences of inclusive education teachers handling other different disabilities is recommended.

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How to cite this paper

Exploring the Real-Life Experiences of Regular Teachers Handling Children with Autism in Inclusive Setting

How to cite this paper: Rowena V. De La Cruz. (2020). Exploring the Real-Life Experiences of Regular Teachers Handling Children with Autism in Inclusive Setting. The Educational Review, USA, 4(7), 135-149.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.26855/er.2020.07.001

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