Journal of Humanities, Arts and Social Science

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Article http://dx.doi.org/10.26855/jhass.2024.05.003

Exploring the Influence of Keep and Mint Health Apps on Health Beliefs and Health Behavior Promotion: A Walkthrough Study in the Context of Health Communication

Fangbin Li

The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.

*Corresponding author: Fangbin Li

Published: June 11,2024

Abstract

This study explores the impact of Internet expansion and mobile devices on health and fitness apps, focusing on Keep and Mint Health. Both apps provide health information, shape beliefs, and promote healthy behavior in the new media era. The literature review highlights limited research on health and fitness apps. Keep focuses on fitness training, while Mint Health emphasizes diet and nutrition. Both guide users through registration and entry processes with personalized fitness and dietary plans. In daily use, Keep offers fitness programs, social interaction, and a commercial module, fostering a fitness-centered community. Mint Health records health data, provides diet plans, and sells health-related products, effectively shaping users' health perspectives and behaviors. However, it is essential to acknowledge potential regional and version discrepancies, and future research could involve user interviews. These apps represent a significant aspect of health communication in the new media era, fundamentally altering how people approach fitness and health.

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How to cite this paper

Exploring the Influence of Keep and Mint Health Apps on Health Beliefs and Health Behavior Promotion: A Walkthrough Study in the Context of Health Communication

How to cite this paper: Fangbin Li. (2024) Exploring the Influence of Keep and Mint Health Apps on Health Beliefs and Health Behavior Promotion: A Walkthrough Study in the Context of Health Communication. Journal of Humanities, Arts and Social Science8(5), 1091-1096.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.26855/jhass.2024.05.003