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DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.26855/er.2019.09.001

A Recent Review of Learning Progressions in Science: Gaps and Shifts

Date: September 20,2019 |Hits: 4879 Download PDF How to cite this paper

Lei Liu *, Teresa Jackson

Educational Testing Service, Princeton, USA.

*Corresponding author: Lei Liu, PhD, Student and Teacher Research Center, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, USA.

Abstract

A learning progression is a road map that shows how a student’s qualitative understanding of particular ideas or practices is likely to change with appropriate instruction. An important goal of the LP approach is to align curriculum, instruction, and assessment to support students’ learning. In 2009, LP research was pushed to its peak and placed in a prominent role in the national discussion on science education. The goal of our review is to analyze papers published in top journals between 2009 and 2018 to identify recent shifts in science LP research and how they address major gaps and critiques. In particular, we will begin by summarizing recent research focused on the challenges of using LPs in assessment and will identify key gaps in the LP research relevant to that area. We will then describe the methodology that we used to identify and evaluate the literature that addresses these gaps. Finally, we conclude with a discussion of the shifts in LP research as well as issues and implications for future LP research.

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How to cite this paper

A Recent Review of Learning Progressions in Science: Gaps and Shifts

How to cite this paper: Liu, L., & Jackson, T. (2019). A Recent Review of Learning Progressions in Science: Gaps and Shifts. The Educational Review, USA, 3(9), 113-126.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.26855/er.2019.09.001

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